Cool is All in the Attitude

We’re experiencing heat unusual for upstate New York. Yesterday the temperatures in town hit 100 degrees F  (37.7 degrees C). Even the normally icy lake feels tepid.

While I feel sympathy for people doing hard, physical labor outdoors (highway workers, roofers, painters, and farm workers are just a few that come to mind), I’ve been enjoying the heat.

Of course, I think staying cool is about thinking cool (and not moving too much). So here’s my contribution to “chilling out.”


 
Ahhhhhh, I feel cooler already.

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Comments

  1. I love hot weather which is why I moved to an area where it never snows and 90 degree summers (low humidity) are the norm. Your video reminded me of the way I feel when I go into stores where the temperatures are like meat lockers. I always wear a sweater when I shop.

    • It’s nice to know I’m not the only person who dislikes air conditioning. I have the vent in my office blocked off and every time I go outdoors I sigh with pleasure.

      Still, I like the “idea” of snow enough that I can’t imagine giving up all four seasons on a permanent basis.

  2. Love it! Although….it doesn’t snow here even in the winter. LOL

  3. You should have put a warning on this! Not to be viewed if you are living in an area that summer has abandoned. Brrrr!

    But thanks for rubbing it in how nice it is there. 😉

    • I can feel your pain. A typical summer here is in the 70s and it takes a long time to arrive.

      I feel like every day I work when it’s sunny and warm is a criminal act.

  4. We are fortunate to live in an area that is typically in high 90s – 100s for summer highs. This year has been unseasonably mild for us (though I think we’ll be in the triple digits today) so we’re reveling in the break.

    • As you’re aware, when people aren’t used to something they moan and complain about it. No one here is talking about anything else.

      I guess you have to talk about more interesting things since the weather is pretty consistent. :)

  5. Oh that is so, um, cool:) I wonder which one learned to slide in the snow first? I’d love to VISIT somewhere with snow like that with Frankie and Beryl. I know Frankie would love it, not so sure about Beryl. But I’m glad it doesn’t snow where I live.

    It’s wonderful to start the day with a few laughs, thank you!

    • I was also very curious about how they learned that habit.

      Most of us who live in snowy areas find that most dogs enjoy it very much–even from the very first exposure.

      I think the motion of the snow falling stimulates them and makes them a bit hyper. It’s very different than rain. I know very few dogs who enjoy a steady rain.

  6. Love this video. I can feel the chill! As I was driving around earlier today, the radio station I was listening to played a Christmas song in hopes of soothing the summer-weary souls of their listeners!

    • I felt my temp go down a few degrees. I’m not sure Christmas songs would do the same. It would probably just make me think about shopping. :)

  7. Air conditioning is painful for me for some reason, but I’ve always tolerated heat better than cold. Maybe it was growing up in a house built in 1914. I didn’t live in air conditioning until college. Right now, though, I’m so done with the heat! Ugh! I feel like I’m walking on the sun every time I go outside!

    • I still dislike the air conditioning. If it were going to be hot another few days I might start having trouble. I tolerate quite a bit of heat–until I don’t. Then I just become a little sick (it comes, probably, from sweating very little; maybe I should try panting).

      It sounds like you’ve reached your tolerance zone. If we’re expecting cooler temps Sunday, I expect their coming from the West so you should have relief soon.

      Just watch the dogs. They know how to survive a hot day–belly down on a cool floor taking a nap.

  8. I am at an age where my personal thermostat is out of whack; I’m either too hot or too cold, never just right. I think I’ll go hide in a sensory deprivation tank.