Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week (And Thank the People Who Help Un-Adoptable Pets Find Homes)

Hound and German Shepherd Mixed Breed Dog

This Post is Dedicated to My Formerly Less-Adoptable Dog, Shadow. I Miss Her Everyday.

Today is the last day of Petfinder’s Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week. This is their campaign to bring attention to the many pets who may wait a long time for their forever homes–because of special medical needs, old age, and even their color or breed. Many wonderful pet bloggers have posted this week on this issue and brought their own special spin to the issue (Check out here and here to find two of my favorite posts on adopting older dogs–my personal soft spot.)

But what Adopt a Less Adoptable Pet Week doesn’t address are the many dogs in foster homes with people trying to help them become adoptable at all. Someone in a shelter or rescue group meets a dog that has great potential. But they have some major issue that prevents them from being adopted. Sometimes it’s resource guarding. With others, it’s sensitivity to other dogs. And some have aggression issues with people.

Two blogs I follow highlight the challenges in working with these dogs (and yes, I know I need to update my blogroll to get more of these sites listed).

First is 3 Woofs & a Woo. Blogger, The Food Lady (it’s nice to see a dog guardian who understands her place in the universe), posts beautiful photos of her Border Collies and Woo (a mystery BC mix?). In this post, she tells of the challenges of helping her foster dog West become less reactive to strangers while managing her life, her other dogs, and the unplanned circumstances the world throws at her.

Second is Dog Foster Mom. Laurie posts about her work fostering pets with all the joys and sorrows that go with it. She has a great sense of humor that comes through in her writing. And Laurie has Ziggy.

Ziggy is deaf. Ziggy is a pibble mix. Ziggy is incorrigible. Recently Laurie had to board her own pet Remi out so she could continue to work with Ziggy and stay within the dog restrictions of her subdivision. Laurie has amazing commitment and passion for fostering.

So when you’re thinking of adopting a less adoptable pet, say a little thank you to the many shelter workers, rescuers, and foster parents who work so hard to help un-adoptable animals become less-adoptable animals (and hopefully, someday, adopted animals).

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Comments

  1. Thank you for the shout out to my site — and even more for your recognition of the wonderful work that shelter workers, rescuers, and fosterers do. Too often their role in seeing the potential in dogs and working to get them rehomed is left unmentioned, and people as well as dogs need positive reinforcement. I’ll be checking out the blogs you suggested, too.